Encyclopedia of Coastal Science

2005 Edition
| Editors: Maurice L. Schwartz

El NiñNo-Southern Oscillation (ENSO)

  • Henry F. Diaz
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/1-4020-3880-1_131

Local fisheries (Enfield, 1988, Enfield, 1999

The term El Niño (or “the child”) was originally used by Peruvian fishermen in the 19th century to refer to a Christmastime warming of coastal sea surface temperature (SST), often associated with an abrupt decrease in productivity of the local fisheries. The Southern Oscillation (SO) portion of El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) describes the global-scale surface pressure oscillation documented by workers around the turn of the century and first studied in detail by Sir Gilbert Walker (for historical reviews, see Rasmusson and Carpenter, 1982; various chapters in Glantz et al., 1991; Diaz and Markgraf, 1992, Diaz and Markgraf, 2000; Diaz and Kiladis, 1995; Allan et al., 1996; Diaz et al., 2001). It was not until the 1960s that Jacob Bjerknes linked the two processes and began to describe the complex interplay between the ocean and atmosphere, which comprises ENSO and can lead to dramatic perturbations of the global climate system. Here,...

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Bioligrophy

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Cross-references

  1. 1.
    Climate Patterns in the Coastal ZoneGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Coastal ClimateGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Coastal Temperature TrendsGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Coastal Upwelling and DownwellingGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Coastal Wind EffectsGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Desert CoastsGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Meteorologic Effects on CoastsGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Natural HazardsGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Henry F. Diaz

There are no affiliations available