Encyclopedia of Coastal Science

2005 Edition
| Editors: Maurice L. Schwartz

Dynamic Equilibrium of Beaches

  • Robert G. Dean
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/1-4020-3880-1_129

Dynamic equilibrium of beaches describes the tendency for beach geometry to fluctuate about an equilibrium which also changes with time, but much more slowly. Beaches, as discussed here, refers to the visible beach including the shore and its underwater extension to a depth that is nearly static over the long-term. Beaches respond on a wide range of spatial and temporal scales to natural and anthropogenic forcing. Natural agents include waves, tides, currents, winds, and other elements whereas anthropogenic agents include interruption of sediment supply and induced subsidence through withdrawal of ground fluids including water and hydrocarbons. Changes of beach position can occur with or without corresponding changes in the beach profile volume. Over a long time period, coastline position can be considered as the superposition of a long-term trend about which substantial fluctuations occur. Some of these fluctuations are quasi-periodic and others appear random. The paragraphs below...

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Cross-references

  1. 1.
    Beach ErosionGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Beach ProcessesGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Changing Sea LevelsGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Coastal Changes, GradualGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Coastal Changes, RapidGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Coastal SubsidenceGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Depth of Closure on Sandy CoastsGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Profiling, BeachGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    Strom SurgeGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert G. Dean

There are no affiliations available