Encyclopedia of Coastal Science

2005 Edition
| Editors: Maurice L. Schwartz

Dune Ridges

  • Terry R. Healy
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/1-4020-3880-1_128
Dune ridges are known variously as “beach ridges” ( Goldsmith, 1985; Komar, 1976), “parallel dunes” ( Bird, 1972) or “low foredunes” ( Davies, 1977). They are a product of a prograding coast with plentiful sediment supply, low tidal range, shallow nearshore slopes, and relatively lowenergy refracted swell wave conditions ( Figure D49). Continuing progradation is associated with plentiful diabathic onshore sweep of beach sediment, alternating with episodes of cut and fill, leading to the formation of a series of beach ridges ( Davies, 1957). Each ridge is thought to represent the previous location of a beach berm, upon which over time a low foredune develops from “aeolian capping” ( Bird, 1972). The height and spacing of the dune ridges is also a function of the effectiveness of the dune colonizing vegetation in binding the sand.
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Bibliography

  1. 1.
    Bird, E.C.F., 1972. Coasts. Canberra: Australian National University Press.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Davies, J.L., 1957. The importance of cut and fill in the development of beach ridges. Australian Journal of Science, 20: 105–111.Google Scholar
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    Davies, J.L., 1977. Geographical Variation in Coastal Development. London: Longman.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Goldsmith, V., 1985. Coastal dunes. In Davis, R.A. (ed.), Coastal Sedimentary Environments. New York: Springer Verlag, pp. 303–378.Google Scholar
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    Komar, P.D., 1976. Beach Processes and Sedimentation. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice Hall.Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Pethick, J., 1984. An Introduction to Coastal Geomorphology. London: Edward Arnold.Google Scholar

Cross-references

  1. 1.
    Beach FeaturesGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Beach RidgesGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
  4. 4.
    Cross-Shore Sediment TransportGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Drift and Swash AlignmentsGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
  7. 7.
    Eolian ProcessesGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Sandy CoastsGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Terry R. Healy

There are no affiliations available