Encyclopedia of Coastal Science

2005 Edition
| Editors: Maurice L. Schwartz

Dredging of Coastal Environments

  • Per Bruun
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/1-4020-3880-1_124

Definition of dredging

Dredging is moving material submerged in water from one place to another in water or out of water with dredging equipment. Dredging is applied in projects of navigation, for maintenance of beaches, for reclamation, to secure construction materials, and for environmental dredging.

Dredging for navigation

From the very beginning of civilization, people, equipment, materials, and commodities have been transported by water. Ongoing technological developments and the need to improve cost-effectiveness have resulted in larger, more efficient ships. This, in turn, has resulted in the need to enlarge or deepen many of the rivers and canals, our “aquatic highways,” in order to provide adequate access to ports and harbors. Nearly all the major ports in the world have at some time required new dredging works—known as capital dredging—to enlarge and deepen access channels, provide turning basins and achieve appropriate water depths along waterside facilities. Many of these...

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Bibliography

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    Bruun, P., 1990a. Beach nourishment. Improved economy through better profiling and backpassing from offshore sources, Journal of Coastal Research, 6(2): 265–277.Google Scholar
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Cross-references

  1. 1.
    Beach NourishmentGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Bypassing at Littoral Drift BarriersGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Capping of Contaminated Coastal AreasGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Engineering Applications of Coastal GeomorphologyGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Environmental QualityGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Human Impact on CoastsGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Mining of Coastal MaterialsGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    ReclamationGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    Water QualityGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Per Bruun

There are no affiliations available