Encyclopedia of Coastal Science

2005 Edition
| Editors: Maurice L. Schwartz

Developed Coasts

  • Nancy L. Jackson
  • Karl F. Nordstrom
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/1-4020-3880-1_121

The term “developed coast” often implies a natural system altered by human action. The type, frequency, and magnitude of alterations are influenced by the social and economic value humans place on the resource. Today, developed coasts are modified and physically maintained by humans to enhance navigation, recreation, and protection of settlements. Human modification of the coast has resulted in changes to the dimensions and locations of coastal landforms and the spatial and temporal scales of cycles of erosion and accretion. Globally, human presence on the coast dates back to tens or even hundreds of thousands of years, with some of the earliest documentation on the Mediterranean coast (Nordstrom, 2000). Deforestation and overgrazing were perhaps the earliest human actions that significantly altered the coast by increasing the quantity of sediment delivered (Walker, 1985). Grazing initiated dune migration when practiced directly on the coast. Channelization, diversion, and impoundment...

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Bibiliography

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Cross-references

  1. 1.
    Beach NourishmentGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Beach Use and BehaviorsGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Coastal Zone ManagementGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Demography of Coastal PopulationsGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Economic Value of BeachesGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Human Impact on CoastsGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Sea-Level Rise, EffectGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Shore Protection StructuresGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    Small IslandsGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    Tourism and Coastal DevelopmentGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nancy L. Jackson
  • Karl F. Nordstrom

There are no affiliations available