Encyclopedia of Cryptography and Security

2005 Edition
| Editors: Henk C. A. van Tilborg

Threshold Signature

  • Gerrit Bleumer
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/0-387-23483-7_429

Threshold signatures are digital signatures where signers can establish groups such that only certain subsets of the group can produce signatures on behalf of the group. The collection of subsets that are authorized to produce signatures is called the access structure of a threshold scheme. More particularly, a (t,n)-threshold signature scheme is a digital signature scheme where any t or more signers of a group of n signers can produce signatures on behalf of the group. In general, a threshold signature does not reveal the actual group members that have cooperated to produce it. Multisignatures are threshold signatures with the additional feature that they reveal the identities of the group members who produced them [2, 12]. In multisignatures, the signing members are not anonymous at all. The special case of a (1,1)-threshold signature scheme is an ordinary digital signaturescheme. The goal of a threshold signature scheme is to enforce dual control over the signing capability...

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© International Federation for Information Processing 2005

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  • Gerrit Bleumer

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