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Crucifer Pests and their Management

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Crucifer crops are members of the family Cruciferae and include cabbage, cauliflower, Brussels sprouts, broccoli, rape and mustard. Grown commercially or as garden vegetables, they attract a large number of insects. Since the common crucifer crops are introduced vegetables, most of the insect feeders originated in Europe or are species native to the United States that feed on a wide range of plants. The importance and abundance of a given insect species changes with location. Insects attacking crucifers can be divided into three groups: (a) leaf or foliage feeders, (b) sap feeders, and (c) root feeders.

Leaf or Foliage Feeders: Caterpillars and Flea Beetles

Caterpillars of moths, skippers, and butterflies in the order Lepidoptera are important leaf feeders. The adults have four large wings usually covered with brightly colored scales. The most common are the cabbage looper, the imported cabbageworm, and the diamondback moth. Two others with potential of becoming major pests are the...

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References

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  • Lasota, J. A., and L. T. Kok 1989. Seasonal abundance of imported cabbageworm (Lepidoptera: Pieridae), cabbage looper (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), and diamondback moth (Lepidoptera: Plutellidae) on cabbage in southwestern Virginia. Journal of Economic Entomology 82: 811–818.

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  • Ludwig, S. W., and L. T. Kok 2001. Harlequin bug, Murgantia histrionica (Hahn) (Heteroptera: Pentatomidae) development on three crucifers and feeding damage on broccoli. Crop Protection 20: 247–251.

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© 2004 Springer

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Kok, L.T. (2004). Crucifer Pests and their Management. In: Encyclopedia of Entomology. Springer, Dordrecht. https://doi.org/10.1007/0-306-48380-7_1086

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