Encyclopedia of Educational Philosophy and Theory

Living Edition
| Editors: Michael A. Peters

Liberal Arts, A Modern View

Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-287-532-7_567-1

At a time when, for the last 70 years or so, the liberal tradition and liberal arts education within it has come under severe criticism, accused of imperialism, colonialism, racism, and sexism, and when the notion of ancient freedom that underpins its idea of virtue and character has been seen to have colluded with slavery and elitism, one can legitimately ask is liberal arts fatally wounded by the weight of such cultural criticism? Does recognition of the need for increased representation and diversity in its curricula and core texts, for example, the inclusion of texts of women writers and, in particular, black women writers, mask its continued defense of an antiquated notion of privilege? Can it, or even should it, survive in this context? In what follows I offer one example of a way in which the liberal arts might respond to this question today. It is, I argue, a radical vision of a modern liberal arts education by Nigel Tubbs whose broadly Hegelian reconceptualization of all of...

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of WinchesterWinchesterUK