Encyclopedia of Feeding and Eating Disorders

Living Edition
| Editors: Tracey Wade

Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (SCID)

  • Deborah R. GlasoferEmail author
  • Amanda J. Brown
  • Melissa Riegel
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-287-087-2_80-1

Definition

The Structured Clinical Interview for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM; SCID) is a widely used semi-structured interview intended to determine whether an individual meets criteria for any DSM disorder. The most recent versions of this measure parallel DSM-IV (American Psychiatric Association 1994) Axis I and II diagnoses (SCID-IV; First et al. 2002a) and DSM-5 (American Psychiatric Association 2013) diagnoses (SCID-5; First et al. 2015).

Historical Background

Development

The SCID was developed and piloted in the years following the publication of the DSM-III (c. 1980; Spitzer et al. 1992). Directly linked to the existing diagnostic criteria, the measure offers a way for clinicians to adhere to a set format while tailoring probes to the patient’s understanding, asking additional questions to clarify differential diagnosis, and evaluating whether the description of a symptom offered by the patient aligns with the intent of the diagnostic criterion....

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References and Further Reading

  1. American Psychiatric Association. (2013). Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (5th ed.). Arlington, VA: American Psychiatric Publishing.Google Scholar
  2. First, M. B., Spitzer, R. L., Gibbon, M., & Williams, J. B. W. (1996). Structured clinical interview for DSM-IV axis I disorders, clinician version (SCID-CV). Washington, DC: American Psychiatric Press.Google Scholar
  3. First, M. B., Spitzer, R. L., Gibbon, M., & Williams, J. B. W. (2002a). Structured clinical interview for DSM-IV-TR axis I disorders, research version, patient edition. (SCID-I/P). New York: Biometrics Research, New York State Psychiatric Institute.Google Scholar
  4. First, M. B., Spitzer, R. L., Gibbon, M., & Williams, J. B. W. (2002b). Structured clinical interview for DSM-IV-TR axis I disorders, research version, non-patient edition. (SCID-I/NP). New York: New York State Psychiatric Institute.Google Scholar
  5. First, M. B., Spitzer, R. L., Gibbon, M., & Williams, J. B. W. (2008). Structured clinical interview for DSM-IV axis I disorders (SCID-I). In A. J. Rush, M. B. First, & D. Blacker (Eds.), Handbook of psychiatric measures. Washington, DC: American Psychiatric Publishing.Google Scholar
  6. First, M. B., Williams, J. B. W., Karg, R. S., & Spitzer, R. L. (2015). Structured clinical interview for DSM-5-research version (SCID-5 for DSM-5, research version; SCID-5-RV, version 1.0.0). Arlington: American Psychiatric Association.Google Scholar
  7. Spitzer, R. L., Williams, J. B. W., Gibbon, M., & First, M. B. (1992). The structured clinical interview for DSM-III-R (SCID) I: History, rationale, and description. Archives of General Psychiatry, 49(8), 624–629.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  8. Structured Clinical Interview for DSM Disorders (SCID). Resource document. www.scid5.org/index.html. Accessed 22 Apr 2015.
  9. Ventura, J., Liberman, R. P., Green, M. F., Shaner, A., & Mintz, J. (1998). Training and quality assurance with the structured clinical interview for DSM-IV (SCID-I/P). Psychiatry Research, 79(2), 163–173.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Singapore 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Deborah R. Glasofer
    • 1
    • 2
    Email author
  • Amanda J. Brown
    • 1
    • 2
  • Melissa Riegel
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of PsychiatryColumbia University College of Physicians and SurgeonsNew YorkUSA
  2. 2.Division of Clinical TherapeuticsNew York State Psychiatric InstituteNew YorkUSA