Encyclopedia of Geropsychology

2017 Edition
| Editors: Nancy A. Pachana

Sydney Centenarian Study

  • Adam Theobald
  • Catriona Daly
  • Zixuan Yang
  • Karen A. Mather
  • Julia Muenchhoff
  • John Crawford
  • Perminder Sachdev
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-287-082-7_140

Definition

This entry discusses the history, protocol, methodology, and initial outcomes of the Sydney Centenarian Study, a longitudinal study of cognitive and physical function of people aged 95 years or more. Difficulties of research involving very elderly participants are discussed as well as future directions for the project.

Introduction

The global centenarian population is rapidly increasing (Richmond 2008), which has raised concerns about the burden this demographic change might have on health-care systems. At the same time, there is growing enthusiasm about the attainability of exceptional old age as well as longer productivity in the workforce and a focus on the role of modifiable, environmental factors in aging. As part of a growing wave of research into the very old, the Sydney Centenarian Study(SCS) was launched in 2007 at The University of New South Wales (UNSW), Australia. The SCS was developed to explore the genetic and environmental factors that contribute to...

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Singapore 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Adam Theobald
    • 1
  • Catriona Daly
    • 1
  • Zixuan Yang
    • 1
  • Karen A. Mather
    • 1
  • Julia Muenchhoff
    • 1
  • John Crawford
    • 1
  • Perminder Sachdev
    • 1
  1. 1.Centre for Healthy Brain AgeingUniversity of New South WalesSydneyAustralia