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Navigating the Pressures of Self-Study Methodology

Constraints, Invitations, and Future Directions
  • Shawn Michael BullockEmail author
Living reference work entry
Part of the Springer International Handbooks of Education book series (SIHE)

Abstract

In this chapter, I will focus on the concept of pressures in self-study methodology with a view to focusing on the constraints and opportunities around two major considerations in self-study methodology: critical friendship and collaboration. Both are widely used in the extant literature, are ill-defined, and may pose some considerable pause from new and experienced self-study researchers alike. A conceptual metaphor developed from my lifelong experience as a learner and teacher of martial arts will provide an additional lens for examining these pressures. I then suggest a different entry point for thinking about self-study methodology: the freedom to be creative in an environment to do self-study through what I refer to as creatogenic and creatopathic environments. The chapter concludes by using this heuristic to provide a brief analysis of the chapters comprising this section of the handbook, all of which have taken a new approach to considering self-study, methods, and methodologies.

Keywords

Self-study methodology Critical friendship Collaborative self-study Creative environments for self-study 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of CambridgeCambridgeUK

Section editors and affiliations

  • Shawn Michael Bullock
    • 1
  1. 1.University of CambridgeCambridgeUK

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