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Self-Study Methodology: An Emerging Approach for Practitioner Research in Europe

  • Mieke LunenbergEmail author
  • Ann MacPhail
  • Elizabeth White
  • Joy Jarvis
  • Mary O’Sullivan
  • Hafdís Guðjónsdóttir
Living reference work entry
Part of the Springer International Handbooks of Education book series (SIHE)

Abstract

This chapter highlights the European contribution to the growing knowledge about self-study methodology. Europe is a patchwork of countries, cultures, and languages. Looking at teacher educators in Europe, we see a broad variation in background, tasks, and opportunities for professional development and self-study research.

In this chapter we firstly map the development of self-study research in Europe which has mainly been the work of individuals and small groups. Then we focus on four countries that are in the forefront: England, Iceland, Ireland, and the Netherlands. In all four countries, self-study has proved to be a useful and stimulating way to aid the transition from being a teacher – or researcher – to becoming a teacher educator. Self-study methodology not only supported the understanding and development of the teacher education practice but also led to identity development. Most helpful proved to be working together and mentoring and sharing results publicly. In this context the role of the biannual S-STEP Castle Conference in England, which offers European self-study researchers to connect with colleagues from North America and Australia, plays an important role.

Keywords

Europe Professional development Collaboration Going public 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mieke Lunenberg
    • 1
    Email author
  • Ann MacPhail
    • 2
  • Elizabeth White
    • 3
  • Joy Jarvis
    • 3
  • Mary O’Sullivan
    • 2
  • Hafdís Guðjónsdóttir
    • 4
  1. 1.VU University AmsterdamAmsterdamThe Netherlands
  2. 2.University of LimerickLimerickIreland
  3. 3.University of HertfordshireHatfieldUK
  4. 4.School of EducationUniversity of IcelandReykjavikIceland

Section editors and affiliations

  • Hafdís Guðjónsdóttir
    • 1
  • Lynn Thomas
    • 2
  1. 1.School of EducationUniversity of IcelandStakkahlídIceland
  2. 2.Université de SherbrookeSherbrookeCanada

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