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Challenges in Engaging in Self-Study Within Teacher Education Contexts

  • Jason K. RitterEmail author
  • Mike Hayler
Living reference work entry
Part of the Springer International Handbooks of Education book series (SIHE)

Abstract

This chapter considers the challenges of impact in self-study in teacher education by framing the issue in two discrete ways. First, because engagement in research is a prerequisite for impact, the challenges teacher educators might perceive in embracing and utilizing self-study of teacher education practices (S-STEP) methodology in their work is considered. Second, because impact suggests that doing one thing will have a tangible effect on another, the extent to which engaging in self-study can influence the quality of teacher educators’ experiences and/or teacher education practices and policy is also considered. The chapter concludes with a discussion and review that invites the reader to contemplate ways forward for self-study research in teacher education.

Keywords

Teacher education Professional learning Identity Teacher education practice Self-study 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Duquesne UniversityPittsburghUSA
  2. 2.School of EducationUniversity of BrightonBrightonUK

Section editors and affiliations

  • Julian Kitchen
    • 1
  1. 1.Faculty of EducationBrock UniversitySt. CatharinesCanada

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