Encyclopedia of Teacher Education

Living Edition
| Editors: Michael A. Peters

Teachers’ Pedagogical Beliefs and Technology Use

  • Jo TondeurEmail author
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-13-1179-6_111-1

Introduction

Defining Pedagogical Beliefs

Several studies show that teachers’ pedagogical beliefs about teaching and learning affect instructional practices (e.g., Ertmer 1999; Lim et al. 2014; Prestridge 2012). Teachers’ pedagogical beliefs are also observed to be strong predictors of their educational uses of technology. Specifically, it seems that teachers select technological applications that align with their existing beliefs about “good education.” Beliefs can be defined as psychological understandings, premises, or propositions felt to be true. According to Pajares (1992), beliefs serve as personal guides that help individuals define and understand the world and themselves. Although we hold beliefs about almost everything, pedagogical beliefs refer to the understandings, premises, or propositions about teaching and learning that we hold to be true. Accordingly, beliefs affect the way teachers analyze, plan, and implement their teaching and learning activities in their...

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References

  1. Ertmer, P. A. (1999). Addressing first-and second-order barriers to change: Strategies for technology integration. Educational Technology Research and Development, 47(4), 47–61.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Ertmer, P. A. (2005). Teacher pedagogical beliefs: The final frontier in our quest for technology integration?. Educational technology research and development, 53(4), 25–39.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Lim, C. P., Tondeur, J., Nastiti, H., & Pagram, J. (2014). Educational innovations and pedagogical beliefs: The case of a professional development program for Indonesian teachers. Journal of Applied Research in Education, 18, 1–14.Google Scholar
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  6. Tondeur, J., Van Braak, J., Ertmer, P. A., & Ottenbreit-Leftwich, A. (2017). Understanding the relationship between teachers’ pedagogical beliefs and technology use in education: A systematic review of qualitative evidence. Educational Technology Research and Development, 65(3), 555–575.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Vrije Universiteit BrusselBrusselsBelgium

Section editors and affiliations

  • Maggie Hartnett
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of EducationMassey UniversityPalmerston NorthNew Zealand