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Women’s Human Rights and the Law of Armed Conflict

  • Judith GardamEmail author
Reference work entry
Part of the International Human Rights book series (IHR)

Abstract

This chapter examines the extent to which the Law of Armed Conflict (LOAC) has developed in its approach to the protection of women in the post-1993 Vienna Conference era. At that time although the topic of women and human rights law was assuming prominence, there was a vast “silence” on the adequacy of LOAC to address women’s distinctive experiences of armed conflict. This chapter identifies and analyzes the significant areas of change, namely, the recognition of the gendered impact of armed conflict on women; the developments in the criminalization of sexual violence in armed conflict through international criminal law; the work of the United Nations, in particular Security Council Resolution 1325 on Women, Peace and Security; and the changing approach of the military establishment of states and the International Committee of the Red Cross to women and LOAC. Finally, the discussion identifies the ongoing challenges for further progress.

Keywords

Women Armed conflict Law Sexual violence International criminal law 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Law SchoolUniversity of AdelaideAdelaideAustralia

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