Advertisement

Fifty Years of Practice and Innovation Participatory Video (PV)

  • Tony Roberts
  • Soledad MuñizEmail author
Living reference work entry

Abstract

Benefiting from more than 50 years of practice and innovation, participatory video (PV) is a firmly established approach in the field of communications for development. The term “participatory video” is used to refer to a very wide range of practices that involve nonprofessionals in making their own films as a means to engage communities, develop critical awareness, and amplify citizens’ voices to discuss social problems that they prioritize. The canonical texts on participatory video all make reference to PV’s grounding in the praxis of Brazilian popular educator Paulo Freire, and the influence of feminist practice is often also noted in the literature. The authors also draw on affordance theory as a way of clarifying the possibilities for social action enabled by participatory video. In recent years, a number of important critiques have been leveled at PV which have reopened a normative debate about what practices, values, and objectives should constitute participatory video. Rapid recent advances in digital filmmaking technologies coupled with falling costs of mobile devices are opening up exciting new future possibilities and challenges for PV. This chapter reviews a range of PV practices, examines key critiques, and assesses potential future directions for participatory video in communication for development.

References

  1. Asadullah S, Muñiz S (2015) Participatory video and the most significant change: a guide for facilitators. Insightshare, OxfordGoogle Scholar
  2. Bandura A (1995) Self-efficacy in changing societies. CUP, CambridgeCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Bau V (2014) Building peace through social change communication: participatory video in conflict-affected communities. Community Development Journal 50(1):121–137CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Benest G (2010) A rights-based approach to participatory video. Insightshare, OxfordGoogle Scholar
  5. Bery R (2003) Participatory video that empowers. In: White S (ed) Participatory video: images that transform and empower. Sage, LondonGoogle Scholar
  6. Braden S, Huong T (1998) Video for Development. Oxfam, OxfordCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Colom A (2009) Participatory Video and Empowerment: The role of Participatory Video in enhancing the political capability of grass-roots communities in participatory development. Unpublished masters dissertation, SOAS, LondonGoogle Scholar
  8. Cooke B, Kothari U (2001) Participation: the new tyranny. Zed, LondonGoogle Scholar
  9. Corneil M (2012) Citizenship and participatory video. In: Milne EJ et al (eds) Handbook of participatory video. AltaMira, PlymouthGoogle Scholar
  10. Cornwall A (2004) Spaces for transformation? Reflections on issues of power and difference in participation in development. In: Hickey S, Mohan G (eds) Participation: from tyranny to transformation? Zed Books, LondonGoogle Scholar
  11. Crocker S (2003) The Fogo process: participatory video in a globalizing world. In: White S (ed) Participatory video: images that transform and empower. Sage, LondonGoogle Scholar
  12. Davies R, Dart J (2005) The most significant change technique. In: Mathison S (ed) Encyclopedia of evaluation. Sage, Thousand Oaks, pp 261–263Google Scholar
  13. Dougherty A, Sawhney N (2012) Emerging digital technologies and practices. In: Milne EJ et al (eds) Handbook of participatory video. AltaMira, PlymouthGoogle Scholar
  14. Fals-Borda O, Rahman M (1991) Action and knowledge: breaking the monopoly with participatory action research. Intermediate Technology Press, LondonCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. Fraser C, Villet J (1994) Communication; a key to human development. FAO, RomeGoogle Scholar
  16. Freire P (1970) Pedagogy of the oppressed. Continuum, NewYorkGoogle Scholar
  17. Freire P (1974) Education for critical consciousness. Continuum, NewYorkGoogle Scholar
  18. Gibson J (1977) In: Shaw R, Bransford J (eds) The theory of affordances in perceiving, acting, and knowing. OUP, LondonGoogle Scholar
  19. Gregory S (2005) Video for change: a how-to guide for activists. Pluto Press, LondonGoogle Scholar
  20. Harding S (2004) The feminist standpoint theory reader: intellectual and political controversies. Routledge, LondonGoogle Scholar
  21. Hickey S, Mohan G (2004) Participation: from tyranny to transformation. Zed, LondonGoogle Scholar
  22. High C, Singh N, Petheram L, Nemes G (2012) Defining participatory video from practice. In: Milne E-J et al (eds) The handbook of participatory video. AltaMira Press, LanhamGoogle Scholar
  23. Horton M, Freire P (1990) We make the road by walking. Temple University Press, PhiladelphiaGoogle Scholar
  24. Kabeer N (1994) Reversed realities. Verso, LondonGoogle Scholar
  25. Kindon S (2003) Participatory video in geography research: a feminist practice of looking. Area 35:142–153CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  26. Kyung-Hwa Y (2012) Reflexivity, participation and video. In: Milne EJ et al (eds) Handbook of participatory video. AltaMira, PlymouthGoogle Scholar
  27. Lemaire I, Lunch C (2012) Using participatory video in monitoring and evaluation. In: Milne EJ et al (eds) Handbook of participatory video. AltaMira, PlymouthGoogle Scholar
  28. Lesage J (1978) The political aesthetics of the feminist documentary film. Q Rev Film Stud 3(4):507–523CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  29. Lunch C (2006) Participatory video for monitoring and evaluation: experiences with the MSC approach. Capacity.org 29. http://insightshare.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/PV-for-ME-Experiences-with-the-MSC-approach-English.pdf
  30. Lunch N, Lunch C (2006) Insights into participatory video. Insight, OxfordGoogle Scholar
  31. MacEntee K, Burkholder C, Schwab-Cartas J (2016) What’s a Cellphilm?: integrating mobile phone technology into participatory visual research and activism. Sense, RotterdamCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  32. Mak M (2012) Visual post-production in participatory video-making processes. In: Milne et al (eds) Handbook of participatory video. AltaMira, PlymouthGoogle Scholar
  33. Miller E, Smith M (2012) Dissemination and ownership of knowledge. In: Milne EJ et al (eds) Handbook of participatory video. AltaMira, PlymouthGoogle Scholar
  34. Milne EJ et al (2012) Handbook of participatory video. AltaMira, PlymouthGoogle Scholar
  35. Mistry J (2014) Why are we doing it? Exploring participant motivations within a participatory video project. Area 48(4):412–418CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  36. Muñiz S (2008) Participatory development communication: rhetoric or reality? Unpublished masters dissertation, University of ReadingGoogle Scholar
  37. Muñiz S (2011) Insightshare’s global network of community-owned video hubs. PLA Notes 63:64–130Google Scholar
  38. Muñiz S (2010) Participatory development communication: between rhetoric and reality. Glocal Times 15Google Scholar
  39. Nemes G, High C, Shafer, N, Goldsmith R (2007) Using participatory video to evaluate community development. Paper for Working Group 3, XXII European Congress of Rural Sociology, WageningenGoogle Scholar
  40. Norman D (1988) The design of everyday things. Basic Books, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  41. Plush T (2012) Fostering social change through participatory video: ac conceptual framework. In: Milne et al (eds) Handbook of participatory video. AltaMira, PlymouthGoogle Scholar
  42. Plush T (2015) Participatory video and citizen voice – We’ve raised their voices: is anyone listening? MUEP, Glocal Times 21:1–16Google Scholar
  43. Poveda S, Roberts T (2017) Critical agency and development: applying Freire and Sen to ICT4D in Zambia and Brazil. Info Technol Devel J 24:119–137Google Scholar
  44. Quarry W (1994) The Fogo process: an experiment in participatory communications. University of GuelphGoogle Scholar
  45. Reason P, Bradbury H (eds) (2006) Handbook of action research. Sage, LondonGoogle Scholar
  46. Roberts T (2017) Participatory technologies: affordances for development. In: Choudrie J, Islam M, Wahid F, Bass J, Priyatma J (eds) Information and communication technologies for development. IFIP advances in information and communication technology, vol 504. Springer.Google Scholar
  47. Roberts T (2016) Women’s Use of Participatory Video Technology to Tackle Gender Inequality in Zambia’s ICT Sector. In: Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Information and Communication Technology and Development, Ann Arbor, USAGoogle Scholar
  48. Roberts T (2015) Critical agency in ICT4D. Unpublished PhD, Royal Holloway University of LondonGoogle Scholar
  49. Roberts T, Lunch C (2015) Participatory video in: international encyclopedia of digital communications and society. Wiley, LondonCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  50. Shaw J, Robertson C (1997) Participatory video: a practical guide to using video creatively in group development work. Routledge, LondonGoogle Scholar
  51. Shaw J (2007) Including the excluded: collaborative knowledge production through participatory video. In: Dowmunt M et al (eds) Inclusion through media. Goldsmiths College, LondonGoogle Scholar
  52. Shaw J (2012) Beyond Empowerment Inspiration: Interrogating the Gap between the Ideals and Practice Reality of Participatory Video in. In: Milne EJ, Mitchell C, de Lange N (eds) Handbook of participatory video. Altamira Press, LanhamGoogle Scholar
  53. Shaw J (2017) Pathways to accountability from the margins: reflections on participatory video practice. Institute for Development Studies, BrightonGoogle Scholar
  54. Singh N (2014) Participation, agency and gender: the impacts of participatory video practices on young women in India. Unpublished PhD thesis, Open University Press, Milton KeynesGoogle Scholar
  55. Snowden D (1984) Eyes See, Ears Hear: supplement to a film under the same title. St. John’s Memorial University of NewfoundlandGoogle Scholar
  56. Teitelbaum P (2012) Re-seeing participatory video practices and research. In: Milne EJ, Mitchell C, de Lange N (eds) Handbook of participatory video. Altamira Press, LanhamGoogle Scholar
  57. Thomas V, Britton K (2012) The art of participatory video. In: Milne EJ, Mitchell C, de Lange N (eds) Handbook of participatory video. Altamira Press, LanhamGoogle Scholar
  58. Underwood C, Jabre B (2003) Arab women speak out: self-empowerment via video. In: White S (ed) Participatory video: images that transform and empower. Sage, LondonGoogle Scholar
  59. Waite L, Conn C (2012) Participatory video: a feminist way of seeing? In: Milne EJ et al (eds) Handbook of participatory video. AltaMira, PlymouthGoogle Scholar
  60. Walsh S (2012) Challenging knowledge production with participatory video. In: Milne EJ et al (eds) Handbook of participatory video. AltaMira, PlymouthGoogle Scholar
  61. Wheeler J (2012) Claiming citizenship in the shadow of the state. PhD thesis, Institute of Development Studies, University of SussexGoogle Scholar
  62. White S (2003) Participatory video: images that transform and empower. Sage, LondonGoogle Scholar
  63. Williams G (2004) Evaluating participatory development: tyranny, power and (re)politicisation. Third World Q 25(3)Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.InsightShareLondonUK
  2. 2.Institute of Development StudiesUniversity of SussexSussexUK

Personalised recommendations