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Workplace Bullying: A Social Network Perspective

  • Birgit PauksztatEmail author
  • Denise Salin
Living reference work entry
Part of the Handbooks of Workplace Bullying, Emotional Abuse and Harassment book series (HWBEAH, volume 1)

Abstract

This chapter introduces a social network perspective on workplace bullying, emotional abuse and harassment. As a type of interpersonal interaction, bullying behaviours can be conceptualized as interpersonal ties, and the bullying ties among a set of individuals can be considered a social network. Moreover, many of the antecedents and consequences of bullying, such as social relationships and various types of interactions, are usefully understood and analysed as social networks. Adopting a social network perspective will not only provide new perspectives for theory development but will allow researchers to take advantage of well-established methods, thus improving our understanding of the social dynamics of workplace bullying.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Business StudiesUppsala University, Campus GotlandVisbySweden
  2. 2.Department of Management and OrganizationHanken School of EconomicsHelsinkiFinland

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