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ASEAN Counterterrorism Cooperation and Human Rights Protection

  • Senia FebricaEmail author
Living reference work entry

Latest version View entry history

Part of the International Human Rights book series (IHR)

Abstract

In the aftermath of the 9/11 attacks, terrorism issues have changed ASEAN’s focus on security. ASEAN took a strong declaratory position against terrorism and formulated numerous counterterrorism measures. At the same time, human rights promotion has begun to gain a strong foothold within regional institutions. Counterterrorism measures adopted by ASEAN member states, however, are not always compatible with human rights protection agenda. The introduction of increased state surveillance and preventive detention to address terrorism, for instance, has raised concern over human rights violations. This chapter explains ASEAN initiatives to address terrorism and protect fundamental human rights. It explains an array of counterterrorism measures at national, subregional, and regional levels in Southeast Asia and the way ASEAN seeks to integrate regional initiatives that deal with terrorism with human rights protection. This chapter elaborates ASEAN institutional efforts to balance regional security and human rights protection through intraregional and extraregional cooperation and their limitations.

Keywords

Terrorism Human rights Counterterrorism ASEAN ASEAN Way 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.American Studies CenterUniversitas IndonesiaJakartaIndonesia

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