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Colonization, Education, and Kanaka ‘Ōiwi Survivance

  • Nālani Wilson-HokowhituEmail author
  • Noelani Goodyear-Ka‘ōpua
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Abstract

This chapter illuminates Kanaka ‘Ōiwi resistance and survivance that has prevailed in the face of colonization and Americanization in the Hawaiian Islands. Despite imperialistic invasions, introduced foreign diseases and the aggressive ideological dominance of eurocentrism to our shores, we have remained steadfast. The chapter discusses survivance and futurity in relation to settler colonialism, erasure, and elimination; thus, contextualizing the historical emergence of schooling in Hawai‘i, which reveals the complexities of partnerships that evolved between Kānaka, European, and American colonists. Traversing a vast expanse of history in a short space, the purpose of this chapter is to articulate the sustained connection between traditional and contemporary Hawaiian education movements that nurture our futurities, or our ways of thinking about and relating to our futures.

Keywords

Kānaka ʻŌiwi Colonization Hawaiian education Survivance 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nālani Wilson-Hokowhitu
    • 1
    Email author
  • Noelani Goodyear-Ka‘ōpua
    • 2
  1. 1.Te Kotahi Research InstituteThe University of WaikatoHamiltonNew Zealand
  2. 2.Department of Political ScienceUniversity of Hawaiʻi at MānoaHonoluluUSA

Section editors and affiliations

  • Leonie Pihama
    • 1
  • Jenny Lee
    • 2
  1. 1.Te Kotahi Research InstituteThe University of Waikato,HamiltonNew Zealand
  2. 2.Te Kotahi Research InstituteHamiltonNew Zealand

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