Encyclopedia of Food and Agricultural Ethics

2019 Edition
| Editors: David M. Kaplan

Food Advertising to Children: Policy, Health, and Gender

  • Catherine L. MahEmail author
  • Sylvia Hoang
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-024-1179-9_482

Synonyms

Introduction

This entry examines the policy debate on food and beverage advertising directed toward children. In particular, we address a number of normative issues for public health policy intervention. We also consider gender dimensions of this policy debate, which have been underexamined.

Key Terms

We begin with a brief discussion of key terms: marketing versus advertising, food and beverages, and directed toward children.

The terms advertising and marketing are often used interchangeably in discussion of this policy issue. Marketing is generally understood as encompassing a broader range of issues, including the “four Ps” of traditional marketing practice: product, price, placement, and promotion. The term advertising usually refers to the promotional component of marketing. In this entry, we refer to the two somewhat interchangeably, with the understanding that broad marketing is likely the more appropriate way to...

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature B.V. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Centre for Addiction and Mental HealthTorontoCanada