Encyclopedia of Medieval Philosophy

Living Edition
| Editors: Henrik Lagerlund

Thomas Ebendorfer of Hasselbach

  • Ioana Curuţ
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-024-1151-5_550-1

Abstract

Thomas Ebendorfer of Hasselbach (August 10, 1388 – January 12, 1464) was a secular theologian, diplomat, chronicler, preacher, professor, and rector of the University of Vienna. He was an extremely prolific writer and his works include: historical writings, biblical and philosophical commentaries, theological writings, sermons, speeches, letters, and other diplomatic documents. His commentary on the Sentences, his major work of philosophy which remains largely unpublished, follows the path initiated at the end of the fourteenth century by Nicholas of Dinkelsbühl, in the effort of accommodating Parisian theology and philosophy to the Viennese intellectual milieu. However, Ebendorfer’s thought departs from the previous “Vienna Group Commentary” in significant ways.

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Bibliography

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature B.V. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.THESIS-Project, IRHT-Paris, Center for Ancient and Medieval Philosophy, Babeş-Bolyai UniversityCluj-NapocaRomania