Hinduism and Tribal Religions

Living Edition
| Editors: Pankaj Jain, Rita Sherma, Madhu Khanna

Meaning (Hinduism)

  • Amitabh Vikram DwivediEmail author
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-024-1036-5_520-1

Introduction

In Hinduism, major religious and philosophical issues are generally discussed in the context of Semantics. The Sanskrit grammatical tradition discusses issues related to meaning in various dimensions: linguistics, ontology, and epistemology [3]. In linguistics, the meaning is associated and studied along the lines of phonemes, words, sentences, and literary studies, whereas “what is real” and “what can we know” with respect to meaning are studied under ontology and epistemology, respectively. It is often said and now it becomes a cliché that seeing meaning in every iota and disliking meaninglessness gave rise to the systematic study of meaning in Hinduism. The Sanskrit word for meaning is artha, which means sense, intent, purpose, goal, meaning, or essence; however, sometimes arthat “that is to say” or “viz” and abhipraya “intent” are also used interchangeably while discussing meaning.

Meaning and Early Hindu Texts

The earliest attempts and efforts to find out issues...

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References

  1. 1.
    Dwivedi AV (2017a) “Samkhya” research starters, academic topic overview, EBSCO, pp 1–4. Aug 2017, OnlineGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Dwivedi AV (2017b) “Ethical reasoning” research starters, academic topics overview, EBSCO, pp 1–4. Aug 2017, OnlineGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Dwivedi AV (2016) Hinduism. In: The SAGE encyclopedia of war: social science perspectives; volume two. Sage Publications, Thousand Oaks, pp 786–787. ISBN: 978-1483359892Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.College of Humanities & Social Sciences – Languages & LiteratureShri Mata Vaishno Devi UniversityKatraIndia