Student Employees in Higher Education

  • Manja KlemenčičEmail author
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-017-9553-1_615-1
  • 3 Downloads

Synonyms

Definition

Student employees are those students who hold part-time, paid positions at the higher education institution where they are concurrently enrolled as students. Campus student employment refers to different types of part-time, paid positions available from the institution (as the employer) to undergraduate and graduate students enrolled at that institution. Remuneration distinguishes student employees from student representatives and other students who volunteer in various service roles at the institution.

Introduction

The number of working students has grown markedly with the increasing enrollments and the increasing cost of higher education. In the United States, with the highest average of working students, on average 70% of students have paid jobs while studying (Carnevale et...

This is a preview of subscription content, log in to check access.

References

  1. Barnhardt, Cassie L., Teniell Trolian, Brian An, Patrick D. Rossmann, and Demetri L. Morgan. 2019. Civic learning while earning? The role of student employment in cultivating civic commitments and skills. The Review of Higher Education 42 (2): 707–737.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Beerkens, M., E. Mägi, and L. Lill. 2011. University studies as a side job: Causes and consequences of massive student employment in Estonia. Higher Education 61: 679.  https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-010-9356-0.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Boud, David, and Allison Lee, eds. 2009. Changing practices of doctoral education. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
  4. Carnevale, Anthony P., Nicole Smith, Michelle Melton, and Eric W. Price. 2015. Learning while earning: The new normal. Washington, DC: Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce.Google Scholar
  5. Curtis, Susan, and Najah Shani. 2002. The effect of taking paid employment during term-time on students’ academic studies. Journal of Further and Higher Education 26 (2): 129–138.  https://doi.org/10.1080/03098770220129406.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Darmody, Merike, and Emer Smyth. 2008. Full-time students? Term-time employment among higher education students in Ireland. Journal of Education and Work 21 (4): 349–362.  https://doi.org/10.1080/13639080802361091.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Ehrenberg, Ronald, and Daniel Sherman. 1987. Employment while in college, academic achievement, and postcollege outcomes: A summary of results. Journal of Human Resources 22: 1–23.  https://doi.org/10.2307/145864.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Julius, Daniel J., and Patricia J. Gumport. 2003. Graduate student unionization: Catalysts and consequences. Review of Higher Education 26 (2): 187–216.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Klemenčič, M. 2015. Student involvement in quality enhancement. In The handbook of higher education policy and governance, ed. J. Huisman, H. de Boer, D. Dill, and M. Souto-Otero, 526–543. London: Palgrave Macmillan.Google Scholar
  10. Klemenčič, M. 2018. The student voice in quality assessment and improvement. In Research handbook on quality, performance and accountability in higher education, ed. Ellen Hazelkorn, Hamish Coates, and Alex McCormick, 332–343. Cheltenham/Northampton: Edward Elgar Publishing.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Klemenčič, M., and Bo Yun Park. 2018. Student politics: Between representation and activism. In Handbook on the politics of higher education, ed. Hamish Coates, Brendan Cantwell, and Roger King, 468–486. Cheltenham/Northampton: Edward Edgar Publishing.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Klemenčič, M. (2020) Alternative Higher Education. In: Shin J., Teixeira P. (eds) Encyclopedia of International Higher Education Systems and Institutions. Springer, DordrechtGoogle Scholar
  13. McClellan, G.S., K. Creager, and M. Savoca. 2018. A good job: Campus employment as a high-impact practice. Sterling: Stylus.Google Scholar
  14. McCormick, A.C., J.V. Moore III, and G.D. Kuh. 2010. Working during college: Its relationship to student engagement and education outcomes. In Understanding the working college student. New research and its implications for policy and practice, ed. L.W. Perna, 179–212. Sterling: Stylus Publishing.Google Scholar
  15. Perna, L.W., ed. 2010. Understanding the working college student. New research and its implications for policy and practice. Sterling: Stylus Publishing.Google Scholar
  16. Soliz, A., and B.T. Long. 2016. Does working help or hurt college students? The effects of federal work-study participation on student outcomes. A CAPSEE working paper. New York, NY: Center for Analysis of Postsecondary Education and Employment, Teachers College, Columbia University https://capseecenter.org/does-working-help-or-hurt-college-students/
  17. Tuttle, T., McKinney, J., and M. Raho. 2005. College students working: The choice nexus. Bloomington.Google Scholar
  18. Ziskin, M., V. Torres, D. Hossler, and J.D.K. Gross. 2010. Mobile working students: A delicate balance of college, family, and work. In Understanding the working college student. New research and its implications for policy and practice, ed. L.W. Perna, 67–92. Sterling: Stylus Publishing.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Nature B.V. 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Sociology, Faculty of Arts and SciencesHarvard UniversityCambridgeUSA

Section editors and affiliations

  • Manja Klemenčič
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Sociology, Faculty of Arts and SciencesHarvard UniversityCambridgeUSA