Partnerships and Joint Programs in Higher Education, Management of

  • Clare OvermannEmail author
  • Matthias KuderEmail author
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-017-9553-1_256-1

Synonyms

Definitions

The management of partnerships and joint programs involves higher education institutions. In this context, a partnership is defined as a formal alliance between two or more higher education institutions developed through an intentional process whereby the partners share resources and leverage complementary strengths to achieve defined common objectives. Strategic cooperation is tied to the strategic goals and objectives of an academic unit, college, or the university as a whole. It indicates a multi-dimensional engagement between the involved institutions and implies the joint undertaking of a diverse range of activities with the aim of the parties’ mutual benefit.

Joint programsrefer to joint or double degree programs, which are study programs collaboratively offered by two (or more) higher education institutions located in different countries. They...

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Institute of International EducationNew YorkUSA
  2. 2.Senate Chancellery – Science and ResearchBerlinGermany

Section editors and affiliations

  • Hans De Wit
    • 1
  • Laura Rumbley
    • 2
  • Fiona Hunter
    • 3
  • Lisa Unangst
    • 4
  • Edward Choi
    • 5
  1. 1.Center for International Higher EducationBoston CollegeBostonUSA
  2. 2.Center for International Higher EducationBoston CollegeChestnut HillUSA
  3. 3.Centre for Higher Education InternationalisationUniversità Cattolica del Sacro CuoreMilanoItaly
  4. 4.Center for International Higher EducationBoston CollegeChestnut HillU.S.A.
  5. 5.Center for International Higher EducationBoston CollegeChestnut HillU.S.A.