Encyclopedia of Marine Geosciences

Living Edition
| Editors: Jan Harff, Martin Meschede, Sven Petersen, Jörn Thiede

Convergence Texture of Seismic Reflectors

Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-007-6644-0_157-1

Depositional and erosional bounding surfaces define sedimentary sequences, systems tracts, and parasequences (see section on the topics of Sedimentary Sequence/Systems Tracts/Parasequence in the encyclopedia). They match surfaces that coincide with the convergence and termination of seismic reflectors but are best displayed in outcrops and are often easily identified in well logs and cores.

In seismic reflection data the convergence and termination patterns and their continuity are used to identify sequence stratigraphic surfaces. On seismic data the most prominent of these surfaces are subaerial unconformities marking sequence boundaries (SB) eroded during sea-level fall (Sloss et al., 1949) and time-equivalent submarine correlative conformities (SB-CC) (Hunt and Tucker, 1992; Posamentier et al., 1988; Fig. 1).

Keywords

Seismic Reflection Sequence Boundary Seismic Reflection Data Maximum Flooding Surface Minor Erosion 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.
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Bibliography

  1. Catuneanu, O., 2002. Sequence stratigraphy of clastic systems: concepts, merits, and pitfalls. Journal of African Earth Sciences, 35(1), 1–43.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Hunt, D., and Tucker, M. E., 1992. Stranded parasequences and the forced regressive wedge systems tract: deposition during base-level fall. Sedimentary Geology, 81, 1–9.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Sloss, L. L., 1963. Sequences in the cratonic interior of North America. Geological Society of America Bulletin, 74, 93–114.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Earth and Ocean SciencesUniversity of South CarolinaColumbiaUSA