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Sony QRIO

  • Kenichiro Nagasaka
Reference work entry

Abstract

This chapter introduces QRIO, a small bipedal humanoid robot developed by Sony Corporation for home entertainment use. The key concept consists of two elements: “motion entertainment” and “communication entertainment,” for which a lot of cutting-edge technologies were developed. The hardware including Intelligent Servo Actuator (ISA) is designed so as to embed many joints, sensors, and processors into a small size. Its motion control system including a real-time zero moment point (ZMP) equation solver, adaptive controls against perturbations, and protective reaction in falling over is computationally lightweight as well as highly generalized. Motion editing software for the control system is also provided to facilitate content creation. For autonomous behavior control, a lot of intellectual functions including space perception, face recognition, and speech recognition are developed and are integrated in the autonomous behavior control architecture. QRIO was not commercialized, but contributed to a lot of corporate branding activities using these functions.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature B.V. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Motion Control Technology Development Department, Innovative Technology Development DivisionSystem R&D Group, R&D Platform, Sony CorporationTokyoJapan

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