Encyclopedia of Mathematics Education

2014 Edition
| Editors: Stephen Lerman

Critical Mathematics Education

  • Ole Skovsmose
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-007-4978-8_34

Definition

Critical mathematics education can be characterized in terms of concerns: to address social exclusion and suppression, to work for social justice in whatever form possible, to try open new possibilities for students, and to address critically mathematics in all its forms and application.

Characteristics

Critical Education

Inspired by the students’ movement, a New Left, peace movements, feminism, antiracism, and critical education proliferated. A huge amount of literature became published, not least in Germany, and certainly the work of Paulo Freire was recognized as crucial for formulating radical educational approaches.

However, critical education was far from expressing any interest in mathematics. In fact, with reference to the Frankfurt School, mathematics was considered almost an obstruction to critical education. Thus, Habermas, Marcuse, and many others associated instrumental reason with, on the one hand, domination, and, on the other hand, the rationality cultivated...

Keywords

Mathematics education for social justice Critical mathematics education Ethnomathematics Mathematics in action Students’ foregrounds Mathemacy Landscapes of investigation Mathematization Dialogic teaching and learning 
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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Learning and PhilosophyAalborg UniversityAalborgDenmark