Encyclopedia of Biophysics

Living Edition
| Editors: Gordon Roberts, Anthony Watts, European Biophysical Societies

Bacterial Polysaccharide Structure and Biosynthesis

  • Yuriy A. Knirel
  • Miguel A. Valvano
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-35943-9_91-1

Synonyms

Definition

Polysaccharides are linear or branched polymers built up exclusively or mainly of monosaccharides. In glycoconjugates, a polysaccharide chain(s) is linked to a protein/peptide (glycoprotein, proteoglycan, and peptidoglycan) or a lipid (lipoglycans, glycolipids). The bacterial glycome consists of a wide repertoire of cell surface polysaccharides and glycoconjugates, including lipopolysaccharides (LPS, endotoxins) of Gram-negative bacteria, cell-wall anionic polysaccharides of Gram-positive bacteria, mycobacterial lipoglycans, capsular and extracellular polysaccharides (EPS), and S-layer glycoproteins (Seltmann and Holst 2002). A rigid protective peptidoglycan layer surrounds the cytoplasmic membrane in all bacterial groups. Specific surface polysaccharides play an important role in bacterial life and, particularly, are implicated in recognition and virulence of...

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References

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Copyright information

© European Biophysical Societies' Association (EBSA) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.N.D. Zelinsky Institute of Organic Chemistry, Russian Academy of SciencesMoscowRussia
  2. 2.Department of Microbiology and ImmunologyUniversity of Western OntarioLondonCanada
  3. 3.Wellcome-Wolfson Institute of Experimental MedicineQueen’s University BelfastBelfastUK

Section editors and affiliations

  • Elizabeth Hounsell
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Biological and Chemical SciencesBirkbeck College, University of LondonLondonUK