Encyclopedia of Cancer

Living Edition
| Editors: Manfred Schwab

Cancer Causes and Control

Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-27841-9_804-3

Synonyms

Definition

The process of identifying causes of cancer and developing strategies to change cancer risk through health-care providers, regulations that reduce risk, or individual and community level changes.

Characteristics

Over six million people around the world die from cancer each year. There is overwhelming evidence that lifestyle factors impact cancer risk and that positive population-wide changes can significantly reduce the cancer burden. Current epidemiologic evidence links behavioral factors to a variety of diseases, including the most common cancers diagnosed in the developed world – lung cancer, colorectal cancer, prostate cancer, and breast cancer. These four cancers account for over 50 % of all cancers diagnosed on western countries. As summarized in Fig. 1, tobacco causes some 30 % of cancer, lack of physical activity 5 %, obesity 15 %, diet 10 %, alcohol 5 %, viral infections 5 %, and UV lightby excess sun...

Keywords

Physical Activity Prostate Cancer Cancer Risk Cervical Cancer Breast Cancer Risk 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.
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References

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  5. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (1996) Physical activity and health: a report of the Surgeon General. US Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, AtlantaGoogle Scholar

See Also

  1. (2012) Colorectal cancer. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 916. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_1265Google Scholar
  2. (2012) Folate. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 1440. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_2231Google Scholar
  3. (2012) Hepatitis B Virus. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 1663. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_2659Google Scholar
  4. (2012) HIV. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 1706. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_2764Google Scholar
  5. (2012) Lycopene. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 2116. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_3441Google Scholar
  6. (2012) MTFR. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, pp 2383–2384. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_6767Google Scholar
  7. (2012) Prostate cancer. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, pp 3009–3010. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_6576Google Scholar
  8. (2012) Renal cancer. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, pp 3225–3226. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_6575Google Scholar
  9. (2012) Tobacco. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, pp 3716–3717. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_5844Google Scholar
  10. (2012) Ultraviolet light. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 3841. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_6101Google Scholar
  11. (2012) Viruses. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 3924. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_6203Google Scholar
  12. (2012) Vitamin A. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 3925. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_6205Google Scholar
  13. Möslein G (2009) Colon cancer. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, pp 722–727. doi:10.1007/978-3-540-47648-1_126CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Washington University in St. LouisSt. LouisUSA