Encyclopedia of Cancer

Living Edition
| Editors: Manfred Schwab

Antiglycolytics and Cancer

Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-27841-9_7218-1

Synonyms

Definition

The strict dependence of cancer cells on glycolysis for ATP synthesis stimulates the development of molecules acting as inhibitors of enzymes distributed along the glycolytic or the pentose phosphate pathway. Several drugs acting as glycolytic inhibitors have been tested, and their efficacy has been discussed in many reports. Some have been used in clinical studies or are still in use in basic research. Here we discuss their mechanisms and therapeutic effects.

Characteristics

The hallmark of aggressive cancer cells is an intense glucose metabolism. Warburg first discovered that cancer cells actively use glycolysis for ATP synthesis, even in the presence of oxygen, a condition in which glycolytic flux is reduced in normal cells (Pasteur effect) and ATP synthesis occurs through mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. In cancer cells, generally characterized by impaired ability to...

Keywords

Positron Emission Tomography Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Pentose Phosphate Pathway Glycolytic Flux Mitochondrial Oxidative Phosphorylation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.
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References

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See Also

  1. (2012) Adenocarcinoma . In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 48. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_84Google Scholar
  2. (2012) Cell cycle arrest. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 737. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_995Google Scholar
  3. (2012) Cell death. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 737. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_6724Google Scholar
  4. (2012) Cell lines. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 738. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_1002Google Scholar
  5. (2012) Clinical studies. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 883. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_1215Google Scholar
  6. (2012) 2-Deoxy-d-glucose. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 1087. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_1565Google Scholar
  7. (2012) Doxorubicin. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 1159. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_1722Google Scholar
  8. (2012) Glioma. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 1557. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_2423Google Scholar
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  11. (2012) Lactate. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 1967. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_3259Google Scholar
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  18. (2012) Respiratory chain. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 3264. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_5057Google Scholar
  19. (2012) ROS. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 3321. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_5125Google Scholar
  20. (2012) Succinate dehydrogenase. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 3554. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_6880Google Scholar
  21. (2012) Toxicity. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 3731. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_5868Google Scholar
  22. (2012) Tumor metabolism. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 3796. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_6038Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Experimental MedicineUniversity of PerugiaPerugiaItaly