Encyclopedia of Cancer

Living Edition
| Editors: Manfred Schwab

Monoclonal Antibodies for Cancer Therapy

Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-27841-9_7071-3

Definition

A monoclonal antibody (Mab) is made by a population of identical immune cells that are the progeny of a unique parent cell. Mab therapy of cancer is a form of immunotherapy in which a patient is injected, most often intravenously, with a Mab with the purpose to destroy the tumor or at least delay its growth. Most Mabs used for cancer therapy are of the IgG subtype 1.

Characteristics

Background

More than a century ago, Paul Ehrlich proposed that antibodies can be used as “magic bullets” to specifically destroy cancer cells, and it has been known since the 1960s that one can make antibodies which have greater specificity for neoplastic cells than their normal counterparts, for example, by immunizing rabbits and absorbing the sera with normal tissues. However, injecting cancer patients with such sera gave no therapeutic benefit and often caused toxicity because of allergic reactions.

Antibodies regained interest for cancer therapy in 1975 when Köhler and Milstein discovered...

Keywords

Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Acute Myeloid Leukemia Treg Cell Tumor Antigen Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.
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See Also

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of PathologyUniversity of WashingtonSeattleUSA