Encyclopedia of Cancer

Living Edition
| Editors: Manfred Schwab

Bisphosphonates

Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-27841-9_660-2

Definition

Bisphosphonates are potent inhibitors of osteoclast-mediated bone resorption. These compounds are stable analogues of the inorganic pyrophosphate (PPi), which is an endogenous regulator of bone mineralization.

Characteristics

Bisphosphonates were developed in the nineteenth century for industrial use, in particular as “water softeners.” The first clinical use of bisphosphonates in humans was in the 1960s for the treatment of Paget disease, a focal disorder of bone remodeling due to abnormally increased osteoclast-mediated bone resorption. So far, bisphosphonates have been successfully studied in several clinical disorders characterized by an alteration in bone resorption, such as metastatic and osteolytic bone diseases, hypercalcemia of malignancy, and osteoporosis.

All bisphosphonates share a common structure which consists of two phosphate groups attached to a single carbon atom (P-C-P) (See Fig. 1).

Keywords

Breast Cancer Bone Mineral Density Multiple Myeloma Bone Metastasis Zoledronic Acid 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.
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References

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See Also

  1. (2012) Alkyl. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 132. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_181Google Scholar
  2. (2012) Bone resorption. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 446. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_684Google Scholar
  3. (2012) Hydroxyapatite. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 1779. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_2890Google Scholar
  4. (2012) Hydroxyl group. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 1779. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_2893Google Scholar
  5. (2012) Jaw osteonecrosis. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 1926. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_3175Google Scholar
  6. (2012) Paget disease. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 2758. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_4345Google Scholar
  7. (2012) Renal cancer. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, pp 3225–3226. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_6575Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Istituto Oncologico Veneto IRCCS, Division of Medical Oncology 2, Department of Surgery, Oncology and GastroenterologyUniversity of PadovaPadovaItaly