Encyclopedia of Cancer

Living Edition
| Editors: Manfred Schwab

Surface Plasmon Resonance

Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-27841-9_5595-2

Definition

Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) is one of several optical phenomena known to occur on two-dimensional metal surfaces (typically gold or silver films) when a total internal reflection of incident light occurs at the interface of two different substances, one with a high refraction index and the other with a low refraction index. The SPR biosensor, which exploits the SPR phenomenon, is a label-free and surface-sensitive spectroscopic system, which utilizes measured changes in the local refraction index upon adsorption. This sensor may be applicable to disease diagnostics and high-throughput screening (HTS) in drug discovery, as well as to studies of biomolecular interaction.

Characteristics

Detection Principle of SPR Biosensor

Surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs), which are also referred to more simply as surface plasmons (SPs), are longitudinal and collective oscillations of electrons occurring on a metal-dielectric interface. The frequencies of these longitudinal oscillations...

Keywords

Surface Plasmon Resonance Surface Plasmon Resonance Sensor Surface Plasmon Resonance Imaging Surface Plasmon Resonance Biosensor Surface Plasmon Resonance Angle 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.
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References

  1. Englebienne P, Van Hoonacker A, Verhas M (2003) Surface plasmon resonance: principles, methods and applications in biomedical sciences. Spectroscopy 17:255–273CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Jonsson U, Fagerstam L, Ivarsson B et al (1991) Real-time biospecific interaction analysis using surface plasmon resonance and a sensor chip technology. Biotechniques 11:620–627PubMedGoogle Scholar
  3. Ro HS, Koh BH, Jung SO et al (2006) Surface plasmon resonance imaging protein arrays for analysis of triple protein interactions of HPV, E6, E6AP, and p53. Proteomics 6:2108–2111CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar

See Also

  1. (2012) Biosensor. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 415. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_646Google Scholar
  2. (2012) Electrospray ionization. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 1216. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_1846Google Scholar
  3. (2012) Label-free analysis. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 1967. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_3257Google Scholar
  4. (2012) Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 2187. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_3555Google Scholar
  5. (2012) P53. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 2747. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_4331Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bong Hyun Chung†
    • 1
  • Moonil Kim
    • 1
  • Yong-Beom Shin
    • 1
  1. 1.BioNanotechnology Research CenterKorea Research Institute of Bioscience and BiotechnologyYuseongRepublic of Korea