Encyclopedia of Cancer

Living Edition
| Editors: Manfred Schwab

Stromagenesis

Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-27841-9_5533-2

Synonyms

Definition

Stromagenesis, from the Greek term stromatogenesis (yστρω\hskip-5pt\acute\\, μα stroma = mattress and γε\hskip-2.5pt\acute\; νɛσις genesis = creation or birth), is used to describe the progressive changes that stroma undergoes during the process of epithelial tumorigenesis. Specifically, the term describes tumor-associated changes in fibroblasts and fibroblast-derived extracellular matrix (also known as Desmoplasia), as opposed to the formation of new stromal endothelial blood vessels, identified as angiogenesis.

Characteristics

Although the term “stromagenesis” has only recently entered the scientific literature (2002) describing melanoma-fibroblast cross talk, the process of stromagenesis (or Desmoplasia) has been investigated for more than a century. Early publications from several pathologists in the late nineteenth...

Keywords

Hyaluronic Acid Tumor Microenvironment Connective Tissue Growth Factor Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma Stromal Fibroblast 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.
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References

  1. Beacham DA, Cukierman E (2005) Stromagenesis: the changing face of fibroblastic microenvironments during tumor progression. Semin Cancer Biol 15:329–341PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Mintz B, Illmensee K (1975) Normal genetically mosaic mice produced from malignant teratocarcinoma cells. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 72:3585–3589PubMedPubMedCentralCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Paget S (1889) The distribution of secondary growths in cancer of the breast. Lancet 133:571–573CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Ruiter D, Bogenrieder T, Elder D et al (2002) Melanoma-stroma interactions: structural and functional aspects. Lancet Oncol 3:35–43PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Soto AM, Sonnenschein C (2005) Emergentism as a default: cancer as a problem of tissue organization. J Biosci 30:103–118PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

See Also

  1. (2012) Extracellular matrix. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 1362. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_2067Google Scholar
  2. (2012) Familial adenomatous polyposis. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 1373. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_2106Google Scholar
  3. (2012) Mosaic. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 2373. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_3838Google Scholar
  4. (2012) Stroma. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 3541. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_5532Google Scholar
  5. (2012) Teratocarcinoma. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 3651. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_5729Google Scholar
  6. (2012) TGF-β. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 3661. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_5753Google Scholar
  7. (2012) Tumorigenesis. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 3815. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_6063Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Basic Science/Tumor Cell BiologyFox Chase Cancer CenterPhiladelphiaUSA