Encyclopedia of Cancer

Living Edition
| Editors: Manfred Schwab

Resveratrol

Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-27841-9_5064-2

Synonyms

Definition

Resveratrol is a natural molecule belonging to the class of non-flavonoidpolyphenols. It exists as trans- or cis-isomers, both of which are present in nature, although the trans-isomer is by far the most abundant and commonly cited simply as resveratrol.

Characteristics

Resveratrol was first identified in 1940 in the roots of hellebore, then found to be present in grapevines in 1976 and in wine in 1992. Now it is known to be present in minor amounts in other nutritional sources, such as peanuts, blueberries, and mulberries. In grape skin, where it is highly concentrated (50–100 mg/g), resveratrol is primarily biosynthesized in response to environmental stresses, such as UV radiation, ozone exposure, low temperature, injury, or fungal infections (mainly by Botrytis cinerea). In wine, its concentration ranges from 0.7 to 7.7 mg/L, depending on cultivar, climate, and stress agents, red wines being approximately tenfold more enriched than...

Keywords

Botrytis Cinerea Preneoplastic Lesion Resveratrol Treatment Wine Polyphenol Antiaggregative Effect 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.
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References

  1. Baar JA, Sinclair DA (2006) Therapeutic potential of resveratrol: the in vivo evidence. Nat Rev Drug Discov 5:493–506CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Jang M, Cai L, Udeani GO et al (1997) Cancer chemopreventive activity of resveratrol, a natural product derived from grapes. Science 275:218–220CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  3. Langkake P, Pryce RJ (1976) The production of resveratrol by Vitis vinifera and other members of the Vitacea as a response to infection or injury. Physiol Plant Pathol 9:77–86CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Signorelli P, Ghidoni R (2005) Resveratrol as an anticancer nutrient: molecular basis, open questions and promises. J Nutr Biochem 16:449–466CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar

See Also

  1. (2012) Cell cycle. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 737. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_994Google Scholar
  2. (2012) Cyclooxygenases. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, pp 1035–1036. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_1434Google Scholar
  3. (2012) DMBA. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 1128. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_1660Google Scholar
  4. (2012) Glutathione. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 1559. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_2438Google Scholar
  5. (2012) Initiation. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 1865. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_3057Google Scholar
  6. (2012) MRP. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 2382. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_3858Google Scholar
  7. (2012) NAD(P)H-quinone oxidoreductase. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 2448. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_3958Google Scholar
  8. (2012) Ornithine decarboxylase. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 2656. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_4259Google Scholar
  9. (2012) P53. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 2747. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_4331Google Scholar
  10. (2012) Phase 1 enzymes. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 2852. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_4505Google Scholar
  11. (2012) Plasma membrane. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 2900. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_4599Google Scholar
  12. (2012) Sphingolipids. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, pp 3484–3485. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_5439Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Laboratory of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, San Paolo Medical SchoolUniversity of MilanMilanItaly