Encyclopedia of Cancer

Living Edition
| Editors: Manfred Schwab

Recombinant Therapeutics

Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-27841-9_4994-2

Synonyms

Definition

Recombinant therapeutics are therapeutic proteins produced by recombinant DNA technology.

Characteristics

Proteins are used already for more than a century in the treatment of disease. The first generation were proteins derived from animals such as antisera used to treat infectious diseases as diphtheria and tetanus and later bovine and porcine insulin for the treatment of diabetes. The second generation were natural proteins from human source like the plasma-derived clotting factors and human growth hormone. The development of the recombinant DNA and cell fusion technology in the 1970s of the twentieth century opened up the possibilities to produce human proteins and monoclonal antibodies in unlimited amount in microbial and mammalian host cells. In 1982, human insulin was introduced as the first recombinant DNA-derived biopharmaceutical, and since then more than 160 have gained approval....

Keywords

Therapeutic Protein Darbepoetin Alfa European Medicine Evaluation Agency Prefilled Syringe Mammalian Host Cell 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.
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References

  1. Schellekens H (2002a) Immunogenicity of therapeutic proteins: clinical implications and future prospects. Clin Ther 24(11):1720–1740 (discussion 1719)CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. Schellekens H (2002b) Bioequivalence and the immunogenicity of biopharmaceuticals. Nat Rev Drug Discov 1(6):457–462CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  3. Schellekens H (2004a) Biosimilar therapeutic agents: issues with bioequivalence and immunogenicity. Eur J Clin Invest 34(12):797–799CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  4. Schellekens H (2004b) How similar do “biosimilars” need to be? Nat Biotechnol 22(11):1357–1359CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar

See Also

  1. (2012) Autocrine. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 311. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_468Google Scholar
  2. (2012) Granulocyte-Colony Stimulating Factor. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 1597. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_2505Google Scholar
  3. (2012) Interferon. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 1888. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_3090Google Scholar
  4. (2012) Monoclonal Antibody. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 2367. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_6842Google Scholar
  5. (2012) Paracrine. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 2783. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_4380Google Scholar
  6. (2012) Pharmacokinetics. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 2845. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_4500Google Scholar
  7. (2012) Pegylation. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 2806. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_4435Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Innovation Studies, Department of Pharmaceutical SciencesUtrecht UniversityTD UtrechtThe Netherlands