Encyclopedia of Cancer

Living Edition
| Editors: Manfred Schwab

Protein Kinase C Family

Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-27841-9_4801-2

Synonyms

Definition

Protein kinase C was found originally in 1977 by Nishizuka and co-workers. The group named this serine/threonine kinase as Ca2+-activated, phospholipid-dependent protein kinase, or protein kinase C in short, since the kinase activity was found to be increased in the presence of phospholipids and calcium. Today, human protein kinase C (PKC) family is known to consist of at least 11 serine/threonine kinases which are classified into three major groups based on their structure and biochemical properties: classical (α, βI, βII, γ), novel (δ, ε, η, and θ), and atypical (ζ and ι). PKCμ differs structurally from all three major groups. The genes of different PKC isoenzymes are dispersed throughout the genome. Different PKCs play a role in multiple cellular processes, which are important in cancer cell behavior. PKCs exert their functions by phosphorylating their target proteins, which are numerous and largely...

Keywords

Urinary Bladder Cancer Plasma Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Level Regulate Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Expression 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.
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References

  1. Aaltonen V, Koivunen J, Laato M et al (2006) Heterogeneity of cellular proliferation within transitional cell carcinoma: correlation of protein kinase C α/βI expression and activity. J Histochem Cytochem 54(7):795–806CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
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  3. Koivunen J, Aaltonen V, Koskela S et al (2004) Protein kinase C alpha/beta inhibitor Go6976 promotes formation of cell junctions and inhibits invasion of urinary bladder carcinoma cells. Cancer Res 64(16):5693–5701CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
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See Also

  1. (2012) C-Abl. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 578. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_758Google Scholar
  2. (2012) C-Myc. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 886. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_1232Google Scholar
  3. (2012) Cytochrome c. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 1043. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_1458Google Scholar
  4. (2012) Diacylglycerol. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 1108. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_1604Google Scholar
  5. (2012) Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 1570. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_2448Google Scholar
  6. (2012) Inositoltrisphosphate. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 1873. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_3072Google Scholar
  7. (2012) Multidrug Resistance. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 2393. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_3887Google Scholar
  8. (2012) Neurofibromin. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 2498. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_4038Google Scholar
  9. (2012) P53. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 2747. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_4331Google Scholar
  10. (2012) Phosphatidylserine. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 2866. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_4531Google Scholar
  11. (2012) Phospholipase C. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 2869. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_4539Google Scholar
  12. (2012) Serine/Threonine Kinase. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 3384. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_5258Google Scholar
  13. (2012) Tumor Promoter. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 3800. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_6047Google Scholar
  14. (2012) VEGF. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 3906. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_6174Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of AnatomyInstitute of Biomedicine, University of TurkuTurkuFinland
  2. 2.Department of OphthalmologyUniversity of TurkuTurkuFinland