Encyclopedia of Cancer

Living Edition
| Editors: Manfred Schwab

Apoptosis Induction for Cancer Therapy

Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-27841-9_363-2

Definition

Apoptosis is a highly coordinated homeostasis mechanism that ensures the timely and safe removal of superfluous, damaged, or dangerously altered cells without causing collateral damage. Imbalances in apoptosis have been implicated in a variety of pathological conditions, including cancer. Tumor cells typically have an elevated threshold for endogenous pro-apoptotic signals, which can lead to a dangerously extended cellular life span and progressively malignant behavior. Conventional cancer treatment, such as chemotherapy and/or ionizing radiation therapy, overcomes apoptosis resistance by inducing extensive and indiscriminate damage in all rapidly dividing cell types, including many normal cell types. Consequently, the therapeutic efficacy of conventional cancer therapeutics is usually limited by their severe side effects. Therefore, cancer researchers have focused on the design of new strategies that more selectively tip the balance of cellular fate of cancer cells toward...

Keywords

Ionize Radiation Therapy Apoptosis Induction Bystander Effect Immune Effector Cell Apoptotic Machinery 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.
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References

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See Also

  1. (2012) Fas Ligand. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 1380. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_2126Google Scholar
  2. (2012) Growth Arrest. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 1607. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_2519Google Scholar
  3. (2012) Homeostasis. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 1723. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_2789Google Scholar
  4. (2012) Inhibitor of Apoptosis Family. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 1864. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_3052Google Scholar
  5. (2012) Malignant Progression. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, pp 2149-2150. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_3517Google Scholar
  6. (2012) P53. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 2747. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_4331Google Scholar
  7. (2012) Phosphorylation. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 2870. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_4544Google Scholar
  8. (2012) Senescence. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 3370. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_5236Google Scholar
  9. (2012) Tumor Suppressor. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 3803. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_6056Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Section Medical Biology, Laboratory for Tumor ImmunologyUniversity Medical Center GroningenGroningenThe Netherlands
  2. 2.Groningen University Institute for Drug Exploration (GUIDE), University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Section Medical Biology, Laboratory for Tumor ImmunologyUniversity Medical Center GroningenGroningenThe Netherlands