Encyclopedia of Cancer

Living Edition
| Editors: Manfred Schwab

GLI Proteins

Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-27841-9_2420-2

Synonyms

Definition

GLI proteins belong to the family of zinc finger transcription factors and act at the distal end of the Hedgehog (HH) signaling pathway to control HH target gene transcription.

Characteristics

In vertebrates, three GLI homologs, GLI1, GLI2, and GLI3, have been identified.

GLI proteins belong to the family of zinc finger transcription factors and play key roles in development and disease as they mediate HH signaling in numerous embryonic processes such as pattern formation and cell fate decisions as well as in cancer and developmental anomalies.

All GLI proteins including the fly homolog Cubitus interruptus (Ci) have in common a highly conserved DNA-binding domain composed of five zinc finger domains of the C2-H2 class, which mediates specific binding to the consensus GLI binding sequence GACCACCCA in promoters of HH target genes (Fig. 1). GLI1 and GLI2 encode the main activators of...

Keywords

Zinc Finger Transcription Factor GLI3 Repressor Binary Cell Fate Decision Antiapoptotic Factor BCL2 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.
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References

  1. Huangfu D, Anderson KV (2006) Signaling from Smo to Ci/Gli: conservation and divergence of Hedgehog pathways from Drosophila to vertebrates. Development 133:3–14CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. Kasper M, Regl G, Frischauf AM et al (2006) GLI transcription factors: mediators of oncogenic Hedgehog signalling. Eur J Cancer 42:437–445CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  3. Pasca di Magliano M, Hebrok M (2003) Hedgehog signalling in cancer formation and maintenance. Nat Rev Cancer 3:903–911CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  4. Ruiz i Altaba A, Sanchez P, Dahmane N (2002) Gli and hedgehog in cancer: tumours, embryos and stem cells. Nat Rev Cancer 2:361–372CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar

See Also

  1. (2012) GSK3. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 1608. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_2526Google Scholar
  2. (2012) MYCN. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, pp 2430-2431. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_3925Google Scholar
  3. (2012) Patched. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 2792. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_4403Google Scholar
  4. (2012) PKA. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 2895. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_4581Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Molecular BiologyUniversity of SalzburgSalzburgAustria