Encyclopedia of Cancer

Living Edition
| Editors: Manfred Schwab

Amphiregulin

Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-27841-9_242-3

Synonyms

Definition

Amphiregulin (AREG) is a growth factor that belongs to the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) family of ligands. AREG was originally described as a regulator of cell growth present in the conditioned media of MCF-7 breast tumor cells. AREG has been implicated in different physiologic processes including mammary gland and bone development, lung and kidney branching morphogenesis, and trophoblast growth. The expression of AREG is upregulated in a variety of cancerous tissues, and signaling triggered by AREG is believed to be important in tumorigenesis.

Characteristics

The AREG human gene spans 10 kb in the genomic DNA and it is composed of six exons; upon transcription it produces a 1.4 kb mRNA. AREG gene shows broad constitutive expression, being more prevalent in human ovary and placenta although it is also expressed in pancreas, cardiac muscle, testis, colon, breast, lung, spleen, and kidney, whereas it is...

Keywords

Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Small Cell Lung Cancer Patient Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Ligand Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Transactivation Areg Expression 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.
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References

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See Also

  1. (2012) CAMP. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 603. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_788Google Scholar
  2. (2012) EGFR. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 1211. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_1828Google Scholar
  3. (2012) EGFR Transactivation. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 1211. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_1829Google Scholar
  4. (2012) G-protein Couple Receptor. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 1587. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_2294Google Scholar
  5. (2012) MAPK. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 2167. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_3532Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Division of Hepatology, CIMAUniversity of NavarraPamplonaSpain