Encyclopedia of Cancer

Living Edition
| Editors: Manfred Schwab

Gelsolin

Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-27841-9_2358-2

Definition

Is a widely expressed 82–84 kDa actin-binding protein that is found inside the cells and also in a secreted form in extracellular fluid. Gelsolin severs actin filaments (actin filament severing) by breaking the ionic interactions between actin molecules within the filament and it caps the fast growing (+) end of actin filaments. Filament severing and capping are regulated by Ca2+, the phosphoinositide phosphatidylinositol 4, 5 bisphosphate (PIP2), and pH.

Characteristics

Cytoplasmic gelsolin was discovered in 1979 and named for its ability to activate gel–sol transformation of actin filaments in a Ca2+-dependant manner. Gelsolin is the founding member of a gelsolin family of actin filament severing and/or capping proteins. Other members include villin, scinderin, adseverin, CapG, and flightless I. Among these, gelsolin and CapG have been implicated as tumor suppressors.

The actin cytoskeleton is remodeled dynamically during cell movements. Gelsolin contributes to dynamic...

Keywords

Actin Filament Bladder Cancer Cell Line Ovarian Tumor Cell Line Epithelial Tumor Cell Line Gelsolin Level 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.
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References

  1. Chaponnier C, Gabbiani G (1989) Gelsolin modulation in epithelial and stromal cells of mammary carcinoma. Am J Pathol 134:597–603PubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
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  3. Silacci P, Mazzolai L, Gauci C et al (2004) Gelsolin superfamily proteins: key regulators of cellular functions. Cell Mol Life Sci 61:2614–2623CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  4. Thor AD, Edgerton SM, Liu S et al (2001) Gelsolin as a negative prognostic factor and effector of motility in erbB-2-positive epidermal growth factor receptor-positive breast cancers. Clin Cancer Res 7:2415–2424PubMedGoogle Scholar
  5. Yang J, Tan D, Asch HL et al (2004) Prognostic significance of gelsolin expression level and variability in non-small cell lung cancer. Lung Cancer 46:29–42CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar

See Also

  1. (2012) Actin. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, pp 18–19. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_42Google Scholar
  2. (2012) Actin Cytoskeleton. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 19. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_43Google Scholar
  3. (2012) Actin Filament Severing. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 19. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_44Google Scholar
  4. (2012) Cadherins. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, pp 581–582. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_770Google Scholar
  5. (2012) Caspase-3. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 675. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_874Google Scholar
  6. (2012) Ductal Carcinomas. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 1171. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_1749Google Scholar
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  8. (2012) Gelsolin Family. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 1519. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_2359Google Scholar
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  17. (2012) Tumor Suppressor. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 3803. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_6056Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Pathology and ImmunologyUniversity of GenevaGenevaSwitzerland
  2. 2.Department of PhysiologyUniversity of Texas Southwestern Medical CenterDallasUSA