Encyclopedia of Cancer

Living Edition
| Editors: Manfred Schwab

Drug Delivery Systems for Cancer Treatment

Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-27841-9_1734-2

Synonyms

DDS

Keywords

Tumor neovasculature; Drug delivery; Nanoparticles

Definition

Drug delivery systems (DDS) are defined as effective systems that deliver optimal amounts of drugs or chemicals to target tissues, enhancing drug efficacy and reducing adverse effects.

Characteristics

Drugs or chemicals for treatment of diseases are often tablets or solutions that are designed to enhance absorption in vivo. Efficient absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion during the process of drug delivery are major issues of drug therapies. However, diffusion of drugs before they reach to the target tissues occurs in many cases. Therefore, an amount of drugs properly targeting the desired tissues become low, and more importantly it is difficult to control the drug concentration in the disease foci. Furthermore, drugs must be administered in large amounts to exert their beneficial effects; therefore they affect normal cells, and adverse effects may occur.

Drug delivery systems are designed...

Keywords

Positron Emission Tomography Drug Delivery Drug Delivery System Vascular Wall Target Drug Delivery 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.
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References

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See Also

  1. (2012) Liposomes. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 2063. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_3388Google Scholar
  2. (2012) Nanoparticles. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 2449. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_3964Google Scholar
  3. (2012) Neovascularization. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 2474. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_4016Google Scholar
  4. (2012) Prodrug. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 2989. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_4751Google Scholar
  5. (2012) Sustained release. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 3586. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_5609Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Division for Therapies against Intractable Diseases, Institute for Comprehensive Medical Science (ICMS)Fujita Health UniversityToyoakeJapan