Encyclopedia of Cancer

Living Edition
| Editors: Manfred Schwab

Dioxin

Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-27841-9_1633-3

Synonyms

Definition

Dioxin is an unwanted by-product of a number of chemical and industrial processes. It was first observed as a contaminant formed in the synthesis of trichlorophenols used for the production of certain herbicides. Later it was recognized that small amounts of dioxin (as well as other dioxins) can be produced during different types of combustion processes including the burning of chlorine-containing materials such as chemical and hospital wastes and sewage sludge. Dioxin may also be formed during manufacturing processes utilizing chlorine. These include the bleaching of pulp and paper and chlorine-dependent regeneration of metal catalysts. Dioxin and numerous dioxin-like chemicals are ubiquitously present in trace amounts in the environment (Fig. 1).

Keywords

Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Ligand Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Signaling Dioxin Exposure Increase Cancer Incidence 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.
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References

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See Also

  1. (2012) BHLH-PAS proteins. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 389. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_605Google Scholar
  2. (2012) Carcinogen. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 644. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_839Google Scholar
  3. (2012) Chaperone. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 754. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_1046Google Scholar
  4. (2012) Cyclooxygenase-2. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 1035. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_1435Google Scholar
  5. (2012) Domain structure. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 1150. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_1703Google Scholar
  6. (2012) Gene battery. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 1522. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_2364Google Scholar
  7. (2012) Genetic polymorphism. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 1528. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_2382Google Scholar
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  17. (2012) Response elements. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 3264. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_5058Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of Rochester Medical CenterRocheserUSA