Encyclopedia of Cancer

Living Edition
| Editors: Manfred Schwab

Convection-Enhanced Delivery

Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-27841-9_1329-3

Synonyms

Definition

Convection-enhanced delivery (CED) is a novel delivery method that allows direct drug infusion into the brain in a locoregional manner. The delivery is accomplished through surgically implanted catheters in the brain that are connected to external drug infusion pumps that generate a positive infusion pressure. This positive pressure begins the process of convection, which is the augmentation and maintenance of the brain’s normal physiologic bulk flow of interstitial fluid. The enhanced bulk flow through the interstitial space acts as the carrier of the desired agent.

Characteristics

High-grade primary brain tumors, such as glioblastoma multiforme, remain one of the most challenging diagnoses to treat effectively. Despite a range of therapeutic options and their combinations, including surgical resection, external beam radiation therapy, and chemotherapy, the...

Keywords

Interstitial Space Primary Brain Tumor Bulk Flow Drug Infusion Ependymal Layer 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.
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References

  1. Krauze MT, Forsayeth J, Park JW et al (2006) Real-time imaging and quantification of brain delivery of liposomes. Pharm Res 23:2493–2504CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. Muro K, Das S, Raizer JJ (2006) Convection-enhanced and local delivery of targeted cytotoxins in the treatment of malignant gliomas. Technol Cancer Res Treat 5:201–213CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  3. Vogelbaum MA (2007) Convection enhanced delivery for treating brain tumors and selected neurological disorders: symposium review. J Neurooncol 87:97–109CrossRefGoogle Scholar

See Also

  1. (2012) Cerebral Edema. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 750. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_1034Google Scholar
  2. (2012) Diffusion. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 1116. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_1620Google Scholar
  3. (2012) Ependyma. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 1267. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_1926Google Scholar
  4. (2012) Gyrus. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 1620. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_2542Google Scholar
  5. (2012) Interstitial Space. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 1899. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_3110Google Scholar
  6. (2012) Liposomes. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 2063. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_3388Google Scholar
  7. (2012) Monoclonal Antibody. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 2367. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_6842Google Scholar
  8. (2012) Pharmacokinetics. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 2845. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_4500Google Scholar
  9. (2012) Subarachnoid Space. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 3552. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_5546Google Scholar
  10. (2012) Sulcus. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 3555. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_5559Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Neurological SurgeryRobert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Northwestern University Feinberg School of MedicineChicagoUSA