Encyclopedia of Cancer

Living Edition
| Editors: Manfred Schwab

Coffee Consumption

Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-27841-9_1252-2

Definition

Coffee is a beverage made from coffee beans, which have been cleaned, dried, roasted, ground, and brewed with hot water to extract their flavor.

Characteristics

Coffee, along with tea and water, is one of the most frequently consumed beverages in the world. The popularity of coffee is likely related not only to its taste but also to its content of caffeine, which stimulates the central nervous system. Associations between coffee consumption and risk of cancer and other chronic diseases have been studied extensively. Concerns about potential health risks of coffee drinking raised by epidemiologic studies in the past were likely exaggerated by associations between high coffee consumption and unhealthy behaviors, such as smoking and excessive alcohol consumption. More recent knowledge has put coffee in a more optimistic light, and to date there is evidence that coffee consumption may reduce the risk of some chronic diseases, including liver cancer, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and...

Keywords

Pancreatic Cancer Renal Cell Carcinoma Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Risk Chlorogenic Acid 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.
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References

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See Also

  1. (2012) Antioxidant. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 216. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_328Google Scholar
  2. (2012) Bias. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 390. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_607Google Scholar
  3. (2012) Case-Control Study. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 674. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_870Google Scholar
  4. (2012) Confounding. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 968. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_1304Google Scholar
  5. (2012) Epidemiologic Studies. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 1269. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_1929Google Scholar
  6. (2012) Mutagenic. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 2412. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_3909Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Division of Nutritional Epidemiology, Institute of Environmental MedicineKarolinska InstitutetStockholmSweden