Pharmacologic Intervention for Acquired Hearing Loss: Assays of Drug-Induced Inner Ear Damage

Living reference work entry

Abstract

Hearing can be permanently impaired by therapeutic drugs, most notably the aminoglycoside class of antibiotics and the platinum-based chemotherapeutic drugs. The prevalence of this hearing loss in patients (ototoxicity) has prompted great interest in better understanding the mechanism of injury and prevention. Aminoglycoside ototoxicity usually affects hearing in the high-frequency range before progression to lower frequencies. For in-vitro studies, the organotypic organ of Corti model provides an inner ear (cochlear) tissue preparation for investigating the effects of drugs on the mammalian ear, including testing of drug toxicity, protective effects, and delineation of cellular and molecular mechanisms. Gentamicin is a prototype aminoglycoside, and a gentamicin injury model is presented here as an established preparation for testing potential protective drugs. Similar injury models can be developed using other ototoxic agents such as the chemotherapeutic drug cisplatin. For in-vivo investigation, the guinea pig is a preferred model. Two advantages of the guinea pig in hearing research include ease of access to the cochlea and a pattern of aminoglycoside-induced injury similar to humans.

Keywords

Hair Cell Auditory Brainstem Response Outer Hair Cell Spiral Ganglion Endocochlear Potential 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References and Further Reading

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael J. Brenner
    • 1
  • Amrita Ray
    • 1
  • Jochen Schacht
    • 1
  1. 1.Kresge Hearing Research InstituteUniversity of MichiganAnn ArborUSA

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