Testicular Steroid Hormones

Living reference work entry

Abstract

Castration of young male rats is performed with minimal bleeding in animals weighing less than 60 g. The animal is anesthetized. A small transversal incision is made in the skin on the ventral site over the symphysis. The testis lying in the scrotum is gently pushed into the abdominal cavity. With a pair of fine forceps, the abdominal wall is opened. The epididymal fat pad, easily seen, is grasped with the forceps, and the testis with the epididymis is pulled out from the wound. The ductus deferens with the testicular vessels is crushed with artery forceps and the testis together with the epididymal fad pad cut off with a pair of fine scissors. There is almost no bleeding in young animals. In older animals, ligation of the testicular vessels together with the ductus deferens may be necessary. The same procedure is performed on the other side. The skin wound is closed with one or two wound clips. The animal recovers immediately. With some skill, the operation can be performed very rapidly (Bomskov 1939).

Keywords

Androgen Receptor Seminal Vesicle Sebaceous Gland Cyproterone Acetate Ventral Prostate 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References and Further Reading

Castration of Male Rats (Orchiectomy)

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Caponizing of Cockerels (Orchiectomy)

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Androgen Receptor Binding

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Weight of Androgen-Dependent Organs in Rats

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Nitrogen Retention

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General Considerations

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Inhibition of 5α-Reductase

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Chick Comb Method

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Antagonism of Androgen Action in Castrated Rats

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Anti-Androgenic Activity in Female Rats

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Intra-Uterine Feminizing/Virilizing Effect

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Anti-Androgenic Activity on Sebaceous Glands

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Effect of 5α-Reductase Inhibitors on Plasma and Tissue Steroid Levels

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© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Centre of PharmacologyFrankfurt-Main UniversityGlashuettenGermany

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