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Amaryllidaceae Alkaloids

  • Zhong Jin
  • Xiao-Hua Xu
Reference work entry

Abstract

Plants of the Amaryllidaceae family, including ca. 75 genera and about 1,100 species, are among the top 20 in the most widely considered medicinal plant families. A number of pharmacologically active compounds, such as phenols, alkaloids, lectins, peptides, etc., have been identified and characterized from this family. As primary constituents, up to 500 structurally diverse Amaryllidaceae alkaloids have been isolated to date. These biogenetically related alkaloids are basically classified into 12 different skeleton types according to their ring systems. Representative structures for each type of Amaryllidaceae alkaloids are shown in this chapter. Biosynthetic pathways for each type of Amaryllidaceae alkaloids including those newly established subgroups are also discussed. In addition, recent reports on the occurrence and biological activity profiles of Amaryllidaceae alkaloids are summarized.

Keywords

Alkaloid amaryllidaceae biological activity biosynthesis tyrosine 

Abbreviations

Ac

Acetyl

AChE

Acetylcholinesterase

DNA

Deoxyribonucleic acid

Et

Ethyl

Glu

Glucoside

Me

Methyl

Nic

3-Nicotinyl acid

Phe

L-Phenylalanine

Tyr

L-Tyrosine

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© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Institute of Elemento-Organic ChemistryNankai UniversityTianjinChina

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