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The Potential of Probiotics and Prebiotics for Skin Health

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Abstract

Microbes are ubiquitous in the environment, and despite last century’s improvement in hygiene, human beings are continuously exposed to them. In fact, humans are not only exposed to microbes, but also hosting them. An adult human being consists of an estimated 1013 eukaryotic cells. At the same time, human body hosts an estimated 1014 microbes, most of them are in the large intestine but also appreciable amounts on the various sites of the skin. The composition of this microbiota (formerly known as “microflora”) is complex and influenced by various environmental factors. It is, therefore, not surprising that different parts of the human body, which are exposed to the outside environment, will have a different microbiota. The composition and activity of the skin microbiota will be discussed in more detail below.

Keywords

  • Atopic Dermatitis
  • Probiotic Strain
  • Skin Barrier
  • Aging Skin
  • Elastin Fiber

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Ouwehand, A.C., Tiihonen, K., Lahtinen, S. (2010). The Potential of Probiotics and Prebiotics for Skin Health. In: Farage, M.A., Miller, K.W., Maibach, H.I. (eds) Textbook of Aging Skin. Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-540-89656-2_77

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-540-89656-2_77

  • Publisher Name: Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg

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