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Data Acquisition by Imaging Detectors

  • Bernd JähneEmail author
Reference work entry
Part of the Springer Handbooks book series (SHB)

Abstract

Imaging sensors convert radiative energy into an electrical signal and such sensors are available that cover the wide spectrum from gamma rays to the infrared. They accumulate an electrical signal during the exposure time and convert all the signals of an array of detectors into a time-serial analog or digital data stream. The dominate and most successful devices to perform this task are charge coupled devices (CCD). However directly addressable imaging sensors on the basis of CMOS fabrication technology are becoming more and more promising because the image acquisition, digitalization and preprocessing can be integrated on a single chip; hence yielding very fast frame rates. This chapter provides a comprehensive survey of the available imaging sensors, details the parameters that control their performance and gives practical tips to select the best camera for different imaging tasks.

Keywords

Charge Couple Device Dark Current Imaging Sensor Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor Sensor Element 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Abbreviations

ADC

analog-to-digital converter

CCD

charge-coupled device

CMOS

complementary metal oxide semiconductor

DR

dynamic range

DSNU

dark signal nonuniformity

EM-CCD

electron-multiplying CCD

EMVA

European Machine Vision Association

FPN

fixed pattern noise

ICCD

intensified CCD

NEE

noise-equivalent exposure

NETD

noise equivalent temperature difference

NIR

near-infrared

PCI

peripheral component interface

PDF

probability density function

PRNU

photoresponse nonuniformity

SEE

saturation-equivalent exposure

SNR

signal-to-noise ratio

UV

ultraviolet

References

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    P. Seitz: Solid-State Image Sensing, Handbook of Computer Vision and Applications, ed. by B. Jähne, H. Haußecker, P. Geißler (Academic, Sam Diego 1999)Google Scholar
  3. 24.3.
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    J.R. Janesick: Scientific Charge-Coupled Devices (SPIE, Bellingham, WA 2001)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    G.C. Holst: CCD Arrays, Cameras, and Displays, 2nd ed. (SPIE, Bellingham, WA 1998)Google Scholar
  6. 24.6.
    A.J.P. Theuwissen: Solid-State Imaging with Charge-Coupled Devices (Kluwer, Dordrecht 1995)Google Scholar
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    G. Gaussorgues: Infrared Thermography (Chapman Hall, London 1994)Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Research Group Image Processing, Interdisciplinary Center for Scientific ComputingUniversity of HeidelbergHeidelbergGermany

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